The Calm Before the Insurance Storm: What if Hurricane Wilma Made Landfall in Florida in 2015

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook

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Introduction

My Claims Journal series “Digitizing Claims Litigation: Providing Insurers with the Power and Control They Deserve” focused on the intersection of technology and property insurance claims.  In this article, I wanted to discuss more than technology and explore what could happen if a storm like Hurricane Wilma makes landfall in 2015.

Ask yourself: has anything changed in the past decade? We take a look at how indemnity exposure has changed; however, we really focus in on whether loss adjustment expenses would be any different, and we focus on whether the laws and technology have changed anything.

Hurricane Wilma only pummeled Florida for approximately five hours, but its legacy lasted another decade.  Nobody could have predicted that this storm would give rise to over a million insurance claims, and over nine billion dollars in damages.  Thousands Wilma claims were filed each year, and many were not resolved until just a couple of years ago.

Fast forward to 2015. Would anything be different if Hurricane Wilma made landfall in Florida today? It depends on what you focus on. A lot has changed, and a lot has stayed the same. Let’s explore the advances in two key areas: indemnity and loss adjustment expenses.

Indemnity

From an indemnity exposure standpoint, most of the developments since Hurricane Wilma have been positive.  Many of the traditionally hurricane-prone states have compiled financial protection against losses, including impressive catastrophe funds, effective reinsurance, and increased risk transfer to the private sector. Additionally, there has been a strong initiative to educate the nation about flood insurance.

All that being said, the stakes are still very high. Real estate growth is all over the coast, and so are our greatest potential losses. Studies suggest that a hurricane like Hurricane Wilma will still have the same or greater indemnity impact on insurers in 2015.

Accordingly, although we did not learn our lesson and continued to build in the most disaster-prone areas, we were lucky enough to have a long enough gap in hurricanes to save a good amount of money.

Loss Adjustment Expenses

In addition to the lost profit of indemnity, loss adjustment expenses also skyrocket following a hurricane. If a hurricane makes landfall in 2015, will loss adjustment be any less expensive than it was in 2005?

Legal Developments’ Impact on Loss Adjustment Expenses

Lawyers and lawmakers spent the last decade trying to respond to the 2004 and 2005 hurricane seasons. Although there were some positive legal developments, the legal framework is mostly the same.

Florida’s 90-day rule statutory amendment imposed a significant burden on insurers: try to pay all hurricane claims within 90 days after receiving notice of the claim. Further, there have been no changes to the attorney fee statute benefiting successful attorneys representing homeowners. That being said, the ensuing property insurance bills in Florida helped mitigate some of the expense risks. Some of the positive laws in Florida since 2005 include reduced time limitations for hurricane claims, and opportunities to offer modified percentage deductibles.

Meanwhile, in courtrooms across Florida, lawyers spent nearly a decade trying to iron out the parameters of coverage for hurricane claims. When the dust settled, not much had changed.  The vast majority of cases can result in expensive and risky jury trials.

Conclusion

If a large scale hurricane like Wilma makes landfall in 2015, insurance companies should be proud that they likely have the financial resources to help their insureds recover. Unfortunately, despite the ensuing technology revolution and all of the legal expenses incurred in the past decade, adjusting and closing these claims will still cost insurers the same amount it cost them nearly ten years ago. Although the lawmakers and lawyers could not make any monumental breakthroughs, the industry can hold out hope that technology is inches away from revolutionizing how we view hurricane risk.


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