Tag Archives: Litigation

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claim for Long Term Water Leak Not Excluded as a Matter of Law

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook

Overview:

In Price v. Castle Key Indemnity Company, Florida’s Second DCA recently dealt a heavy hit to homeowners insurers’ arguments using the continuous/constant or repeated seepage defense.

Drop of water

 

Facts

The facts in Price were a prime example of a long term water damage insurance claim. The homeowners insurer gathered strong evidence, and was able to show that this leak continued for weeks and weeks without any stoppage. The insurer’s evidence was startling: over a period of more than 30 days, over 195,000 gallons of water escaped from a pipe going to the homeowner’s toilet.  Faced with this evidence, the trial court granted summary judgment for the insurer.

The Second DCA disagreed with the insurer and the trial court. The Second DCA’s reason: the terms “sudden” and “seepage” were “less than clear” when applied to these facts. Accordingly, the Second DCA determined that these words created a latent ambiguity.  The Second DCA instructed the trial court to allow a jury to determine coverage in this case, instead of a judge.

Disappointing Discussion

Although this is the most heavily litigated coverage issue in Florida homeowners insurance, the Second DCA did not take much time to explain its decision.

These long term water damage opinions don’t come often. Usually, claims do not have such egregiously long leaks, or they have some type of dispute on the duration … so they should be determined by a jury. When the rare case like this pops up, you would think the Second DCA would take the chance to explain what types of long term water damage should be covered as a matter of law under these policies; and what types shouldn’t be.

Unfortunately, the Second DCA did not take that opportunity. Moving forward, this leaves many unanswered questions, and a lot of room for interpretation for trial court judges. I wouldn’t be surprised if there were tens of thousands of pending claims with this issue. The parties and lawyers handling those cases don’t seem to have much to work with from that case, unless they are to assume every insurance policy is ambiguous.

Takeaway

In trial court hearings, this Price opinion will give homeowners’ attorneys stronger arguments, but only if the homeowners insurer tries to obtain summary judgment.  Most of these cases don’t go that route.

I would not be surprised to see other DCAs take a different approach than the Second DCA did in Price.  I doubt all courts will be willing to find that every insurance policy is ambiguous as to long term water losses. A case like this is the perfect example of a case where insurers could be granted summary judgment.

We will see how this changes the strategies. Hopefully, we will get some more opinions on this issue soon.


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Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook and Litigation Data Reports:

Before we go on, if you are in the Florida homeowners insurance claims industry and are looking for a guide with the key cases, strategies, laws, attorneys, and adjusters, or if you’re looking for Florida litigation data reports, please visit this page to learn more about our Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook.


Here is a full copy of the order:

Download (PDF, 51KB)

 

New Florida Federal Court Decides Franqui re Florida Sinkhole Structural Damage Definition and Sinkhole Testing Requirements

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook

Are you up to date with the latest Florida Court rulings on homeowners insurance, sinkhole claims, and sinkhole activity?  If you aren’t sure, then make sure to check out this article!


Federal Judge James Whittemore recently joined Judges Radabaugh, Merryday and Lazzara in finding that “structural damage” caused by sinkhole activity must mean more than “damage to the structure caused by sinkhole activity”  This litigation involved an insurance policy that did not incorporate the Senate Bill 408 “structural damage” definition; therefore, the parties disputed whether coverage for sinkhole activity required more than just cracks caused by sinkhole activity.

home 2

More specifically, the Court answered the following questions:

  • Does “structural damage” mean “damage to the structure” or does it mean something more, such as:
  • (1) the five part definition in Fla. Stat. 627.706 (2011);
  • (2) damage to the load bearing portions of the property; or
  • (3) damage that could cause the house to collapse?
  • Does an insurer with a pre-408 policy breach the policy when it does not conduct a full subsidence investigation in accordance with the pre-408 version of Fla. Stat. 627.707?

Structural Damage: The Court ruled “structural damage” in this insurance policy means “damage to the structural components of the building, excluding damage that is cosmetic in nature.”

Testing Requirements: Judge Whittemore also determined that Liberty Mutual did not breach the policy when it did not conduct a “full” subsidence investigation to eliminate sinkhole activity as a cause of the damage.

Analysis:

Here is the complete order:

Download (PDF, 829KB)

Again, we see trial courts construing the words “structural damage” to mean more than what we are used to seeing.  As you know, 20+ courts have determined “structural damage” simply meant “damage to the structure.”  This “lowered” standard resulted in any cracks triggering coverage for “sinkhole loss.”  With the newer interpretations, though, courts are now asking the homeowners’ expert to show that the sinkhole activity is causing substantial damage to important parts of the property.

As you know, this issue only remains relevant to those claims and cases arising under policies without a definition of “structural damage.”  Since late 2012, many of the insurers added a definition and removed all doubt on this issue.  Nevertheless, thousands of cases remain with these pre-408 policies, so these rulings could continue to build substantial momentum for insurers.

Conclusion:

I think the most amazing thing about this line of decisions is that this issue is still relevant in 2014.  Why is the “structural damage” issue still relevant?  If insurers had innovative services in 2006 using the same arguments they had now, they would be done paying the millions it continues to cost to litigate these issues, and the “structural damage” issue would have been irrelevant (one way or the other) 8 years ago.


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A Rare Win Win in Property Insurance as Citizens Settles Portion of Confirmed Sinkhole Claims

Citizens Property Insurance Corporation

What happens when Florida’s Citizens Property Insurance Corporation and a group of Plaintiffs’/Policyholders’ attorneys decide that the litigation just doesn’t make business sense anymore? Read this first of a series on Citizens’s multimillion dollar settlements with plaintiffs’ attorneys to resolve hundreds of sinkhole cases.


Quick Update:

After this article was posted, Citizens settled an additional 300 cases with Thompson Trial Group and 600 cases with Marshall Thomas Burnett.  Make sure to read those articles after you finish this one.

Correction: The Tampa Bay Times is reporting that Citizens may have reported the settlement without having confirmed that the policyholders agreed to it.  For more information on this and other issues relating to Citizens’s legal defenses, see this March 18, 2013 article.

Nevertheless, because it appears the policyholders’ attorneys in this settlement agree this is a good outcome for their clients, there is a good chance that many of these cases will get resolved.  If new information arises, I will update this article.

On March 12, 2014, Citizens announced it will settle 300 policyholders’ confirmed sinkhole claims.  The terms of the settlement include:

  • Citizens agrees to pay for the repairs and stand by the repairs
  • Citizens agrees to allow policyholders to choose their contractors from a pre-approved list
  • Citizens will pay the policyholders’ law firms $2M – $5,000.00 per nonlitigated cases, $10,000.00 per litigated cases

Here is the press release:

Download (PDF, 66KB)

Citizens’ press release applauded coordinating counsel for the settlement.  In the press release, Citizens states that this settlement will save it $30M in legal fees.

contract 4

In my opinion, this appears to be a win-win for both parties.  No one can be sure without reviewing the terms of the releases; however, what is clear is that (1) the policyholders will obtain repaired homes and (2) Citizens will be spending its money repairing homes, instead of litigating these issues.  That means the parties achieved what they set out to do.

Although you might argue that this result could have happened sooner, both sides had significant victories over the past year or so, and this allowed each side to modify their position towards the middle.  This settlement shows that both sides had a mutual respect for each other and put Florida’s and the policyholders’ interests ahead of their own. Congratulations to all involved.

This is also a win for litigation project management. Innovative services like THIS are the only way to effectively handle property insurance litigation.  These cases were not that complicated when you approach them categorically.  For insurers with more than 5-10 law firms handling their cases, panel counsel need a coordinating counsel or a software tool that performs the same tasks and oversight. Panel counsel simply do not have the tools or the incentives to make these types of decisions.

Applying litigation project management principles, coordinating counsel and/or equivalent software needs to direct panel counsel by (1) identifying the insurers’ goals with the client, (2) breaking down each stage of litigation, and (3) determining how to optimize the process at each stage (and not waste money).

Coordinating counsel must also identify and automate the routine tasks, and insurers can purchase customized software for litigating property insurance claims in Florida to automate the routine tasks. Otherwise, all the time and money goes towards attorneys and adjuster laboring over routine tasks all day, and there is no time for critical thinking.

As you can see from the Citizens example, when insurers set up the structure to make intelligent results happen, intelligent results happen. Companies that make these tough, innovative decisions will be rewarded.  Companies that punt these tasks to their attorneys without a top-down strategy will waste millions of dollar and hours to achieve less favorable results.

Takeaway:

Citizens did a phenomenal job of embracing litigation project management.  If they would have added the key component of software to the mix, they could have really gained power and control over these cases from the lawyers.  If you want checklists and guides to help you reach results even better than this without spending a fraction of what Citizens spent, please message me.


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Florida’s 5th DCA Enforces Homeowners Insurance Sinkhole Stabilization Contract for Repair Requirement

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook

The Fifth DCA, in State Farm v. Fred & Carol Phillips, held that the homeowners had to enter into a contract to obtain coverage for sinkhole stabilization repairs determined by the appraisal process.

home 4

The full order is here:

Download (PDF, 72KB)

http://static6.businessinsider.com/image/4fa29707eab8eaf23d000005/sinkhole.jpg

This is a positive order for the insurance industry; however, it may not be broad enough to provide certainty in the trial courts on the main issues being litigated.  Policyholders’ attorneys will argue that this order is limited to appraisal awards where no other breaches exist. They will say that this case does not apply when an insurer chooses its own engineer, refuses the repairs recommended by the insureds’ engineer, and does not resolve damages in the appraisal process.  This is a much more common scenario than the situation in Phillips.

Insurers’ attorneys may argue this is the authority they have been looking for to support a multitude of arguments they have been urging the trial courts to enforce.  To support any statutory sinkhole argument, insurers’ attorneys will urge the trial courts to conduct the same analysis the Fifth DCA did in Phillips on the legislative intent of the sinkhole statutes.  Insurers’ attorneys may also argue that this order shows they could never breach the policy in a sinkhole insurance claim until the insureds entered into a contract for repairs and the insurers refused to pay in accordance with that contract.

From a practical standpoint, the important question is whether this order creates any legal issues that help the parties avoid trying sinkhole cases.  In other words, does this order create any summary judgment potential that was not already present? Probably not.

Ultimately, this case is not broad enough to provide any specific guidance on these issues; however, insurers do have authority to ask the trial courts to genuinely assess the legislative intent of the sinkhole statutes.  Moving forward, it is important to note insurers do have many important sinkhole issues currently pending with the Second DCA, so we should not have to wait too much longer to get answers on the most litigated questions in Sinkhole Alley.

Takeaway:

I have all of the forms and strategies you need to make results like these a reality in any case.  If you are interested in seeing templates, checklists, and guides to assist you with your sinkhole case, please message me.


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A $7M Alleged Insurance Fraud and the Espinosa Arrest Affidavit

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook

Overview:

It’s not too often that suspicions of insurance fraud lead to a lot of evidence, but First Party Property Insurance Blog’s article on this public adjuster’s alleged fraud ring has plenty of details regarding how Miami-Dade police plan to prove their case.  This is a story about arrests, fires, water leaks, public adjusters, and more.  Check this article out to learn more about the Jorge Espinosa case and what you need to know.

And check out our update from May 22, 2015 after the break.


Update

May 22, 2015

31 people have now been arrested. Police raided Espinosa’s house and arrested him for the additional charges of racketeering, arson, and grand theft. As this article explains, police allege Espinosa is responsible for 20 fires and 5 floods.

As discussed below, if this turns out to be true, this is very unfortunate. As I said one year ago on the subject, Florida’s public adjusters can make plenty of money without defrauding insurers. Most public adjusters do practice within the confines of the law, but these bad apples ruin it for everyone – increased scrutiny, increased claim costs, increased policy premiums.

Additionally, this is just more lesson for homeowners insurers. It’s 2015: technology can provides insurers with the ability to know everything about their claims in an instant. Claims professionals armed with technology identify fraud better, faster, and cheaper than professionals using antiquated claims systems.

With the right time and effort, any insurer can have automated reports on all of the key claim factors. Or, without any effort at all, any insurer can use CaseGlide to have vendors populate this data for them, and arm their claims team with actionable analytics on all of their claims.


Original Story

For those of you who missed it, Miami detectives recently concluded a thorough investigation into a potential $7.6M homeowner’s insurance fraud scheme, and arrested 22 people.

from http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-HWm_qXNcim4/TpxrZhFP7EI/AAAAAAAAAPw/SyoyB9ayj7U/s320/20070727_sbcfire_house_fire3.jpg


Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook and Litigation Data Reports:

Before we go on, if you are in the Florida homeowners insurance claims industry and are looking for a guide with the key cases, strategies, laws, attorneys, and adjusters, or if you’re looking for Florida litigation data reports, please visit this page to learn more about our Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook.


If you haven’t heard about this fraud ring, here is the complete arrest affidavit. It’s a must read:

Download (PDF, 3.96MB)

Although I recommend reading the affidavit front to back, here is my summary:

The fraud investigation centers on Jorge Espinosa of Nationwide Adjusters, LLC.  In short, the arrest affidavit alleges that Espinosa and dozens more had a relatively complex ring involving several parties and a referral network. They allegedly had “runners” recruiting homeowners, remediation companies creating exorbitant bills, and fire and water leak creators.  Further, the arrest affidavit details that certain attorneys allegedly knew that the claims were fraudulent, not covered, yet allegedly continued to represent the homeowners.  The alleged fraud amounts to over $7M.

fire 2

Frankly, if the allegations are true, there is no place for this.  There are hundreds of Florida public adjusters and policyholders’ attorneys that make plenty of money without filing any fraudulent claims. Furthermore, claims personnel will never forget this, and now they must to increase their claim scrutiny moving forward to make sure they are doing their job, whether it means conducting more examinations under oath or enforcing other conditions precedent.  This slows the claim process for innocent homeowners. In addition, instead of helping resolve new claims, insurers must assign personnel to investigate their old claims to see if they may have been defrauded.

Ultimately, this investigation is in its very early stages.  We will see whether there is more cooperation that could result in revelations about additional schemes.

Disclaimer: All of the people in the arrest affidavit are innocent until proven guilty.  Charges are often dropped or reduced.


Takeaway:

How can something like this happen? It’s easy when homeowners insurers have hundreds of people handling claims and cases without any ability to easily share and retrieve information. Although most insurers probably had personnel talk about these things at the water cooler at lunch, only one carrier had the wherewithal to take the time to stop this alleged fraud.  What does this say about the way homeowners insurers do business?  Shouldn’t every insurer set up their staff to have the opportunity, time, and resources to conduct this investigation when they need to.

If you want to be able to have all of your claim and case information searchable, reportable, easily retrievable, and usable for the next case, please message me.


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Ten Reforms to Fix Florida’s Homeowners Insurance Market

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook


Average Home Insurance Cost

photo from http://www.insuranceproviders.com/

The James Madison Institute and the R Street Institute issued a detailed report outlining ten ways to help Florida’s property insurance market without raising rates.  The full report is here:

Download (PDF, 1.08MB)

In this comprehensive report, the institutes suggest ten critical changes to allow insurers to succeed in Florida.  PropertyCasualty360’s article provides the following breakdown:

1.     Implement the Hager incremental Cat Fund reduction plan

2.     Establish requirements for “assignment of benefits” provisions

3.     Implement incremental Citizens eligibility reform with a “circuit breaker”

4.     Allow excess and surplus lines carriers to do voluntary take-outs from Citizens

5.     Remove non-primary residences from Citizens and continue reduction of Citizens’ maximum coverage

6.     Expand 2013’s coastal preservation concept to bar other state programs from providing coastal subsidizes

7.     Implement tough, new Citizens and Cat Fund conflict-of-interest policies and make protecting taxpayers a focus of both entities

8.     Create an expert panel to advise the state on the use of RESTORE Act funds

9.     Establish fair settlement procedures

10.   Require an annual report on the combined post-storm bonding capacity of Citizens, the Cat Fund and the Florida Insurance Guaranty Association

You will need quite a bit of time to review the report.  I found two of the recommendations intriguing and worth mentioning:

First, once again you see a group identifying the assignment of benefits claims as a main concern for property insurers.  As you might recall, the Policyholders Bill of Rights Working Group also made several recommendations for addressing the concerns posed by the assignment of benefits/ water damage claims and the associated litigation.  Similarly, the institutes recommend requiring assignment of benefits contractors to comply with the insurance policy conditions that homeowners have to comply with, rather than being shielded by the general rule that policy conditions do not flow to the contractors.  In addition, the institutes suggest allowing homeowners a brief window to opt out of the assignment of benefits agreements to protect the homeowners’ interests.  Overall, it seems that everyone is seriously trying to resolve the substantial burdens imposed by these claims.  I am sure insurers anxiously await to see how and when these efforts will materialize into solutions.

The institutes also recommend Citizens continue to limit its overall exposure, and they single out vacation homes as a coverage risk Citizens should avoid.  There are arguments on both sides here because Floridians obviously welcome the economic benefits of temporary residents; however, if Floridians have the burden associated with a catastrophe, the legislature should pay close attention to the overall economic impact of assuming these risks.  Ultimately, this issue is up for debate and I would love to hear feedback on the benefits of Citizens ensuring these secondary residences.  This recommendation was part of the larger conclusion that we have all heard: Citizens should continue to reduce its inventory.  We all know Citizens is vehemently trying to achieve that result.

The institutes’ report is a highly detailed perspective on the Florida property insurance industry and one certainly worth reading.  It is good to know that, despite the absence of any catastrophes, Floridians are still working on hard on trying to improve this market and prepare it for the worst.


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The Florida Policyholders Bill of Rights Working Group Issues its Final Report

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook


ins a

As discussed this summer, Florida’s Insurance Consumer Advocate Robin Westcott organized a Bill of Rights Working Group to create a Bill of Rights for Florida’s insureds.  They addressed the following issues in great detail:

  • education, transparency, and monitoring the insurance marketplace;
  • improvements to the claim process;
  • assignment of benefits and emergency remediation companies;
  • examinations under oath;
  • alternative dispute resolution;
  • post-claim underwriting; and
  • coverage provided by repair rather than indemnity payments.

The final report is here:

Download (PDF, 2.16MB)

The Group wants the Bill of Rights to have a lasting impact.  For the parts of the Bill that reflect existing case law, they want the Bill to codify the existing case law into statutory law.  For the parts of the Bill that are not yet law, they want the Bill to make new law. Lastly, there is an educational component.  To help insureds navigate claims, they want insurers to provide insureds with a copy of the Bill when they file a claim.

The report is a great snapshot of today’s insurance industry concerns.  I think the Group did a great job of addressing the current landscape.  My only criticism is that I would have liked the Group to disclose, in the Bill, some of the data on these claims.  To get the new recommendations turned into law, the Group should disclose the data that proves these concerns are justified.  In all fairness, the Group might not have needed the data.  The Group was comprised of several insurance professionals with decades of experience.  Thus, they likely used their private data to form their conclusions and recommendations, even if they did not disclose it.

I think the Bill of Rights will be very helpful for insureds when navigating a claim; however, the Bill’s primary impact on insurers appears to be focused on the assignment of benefit-water extraction claims.  If the legislature adopted all the recommendations, AOB contractors will have some new obstacles to deal with, including licensing requirements; limitations to the scope of their AOB contracts; and compliance with certain standards for water extraction.

Aside from the AOB-related recommendations, the rest of the Bill codifies/creates obligations and limitations for insurers, including more standards for communicating during the claim and examination under oath process; prohibitions on post-claim underwriting; and expectations for insurers when they elect to repair.  Ultimately, some of these obligations are already existing law, and I bet most insurers already comply with the majority of the recommendations.

Only time will tell the impact of the Group and its recommendations. There is no doubt that they discussed a lot of major concerns.  We will wait and see what the legislature does with these recommendations. When that time arises, I will keep you posted.

Takeaway:

The assignment of benefits issue is not going way, and its up to insurers to not let this be the next attorney-driven trend.

How can insurers deal with the assignment of benefits issue?  First, get the best management and attorneys together and decide exactly what to do on these cases. Second, pay for routine documents and evaluations only once, then automate any documents or processes that will occur in all of these cases.  Third, enter all of the case information into software (instead of Word documents and emails) so that you can use data to help guide you towards settlement.  Fourth, as failures and successes arise, continue to optimize your system to ensure you achieve the best possible outcomes while spending the least.

If you have any questions or would like to see checklists or guides for handling assignment of benefits cases, please message me.


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The Death of the Concurrent Cause Doctrine in Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims under Sebo v. American Home Assurance

cover3

In a monumental September 18, 2013 holding, Florida’s Second DCA in Sebo v. American Home Assurance ruled that there should have never been a concurrent cause doctrine in Florida, and that the other DCAs have been mistaken for years.  Here is the full opinion:

Download (PDF, 58KB)

As background, many cases involve damage being caused by a combination of excluded and covered perils.  For years, when this occurred, courts would look at the facts and the policy to determine if the combination was dependent or independent of each other and whether the policy terms disposed of the concurrent cause doctrine.  If courts determined that the causes were independent and the policy did not “write out” the concurrent cause doctrine, then it wouldn’t matter if the excluded peril caused 99% of the damage, the damage was still covered so long as the covered peril caused at least 1%.  If the causes were dependent or if the policy had an anti-concurrent cause clause, then the question would be which peril was the efficient proximate cause of the damage – the excluded peril or the covered peril.  (I think I got that right … ).

This gave lawyers and drafters a lot to think about, but the Second DCA says that those exercises were a waste of time.  In any cases involving an excluded and covered peril causing damage together, the efficient proximate cause doctrine should apply.  This not only marks a major swing in the law; it is also at least a major swing in this case. The jury awarded Sebo roughly $7.7M.

Here is the verdict form from the trial court:

Download (PDF, 109KB)

Here is a photograph of this unbelievably amazing house:

 photo from http://www.naplesnews.com/photos/2007/jul/01/38552/

There’s something to think about this weekend.  I am going to think about what this means for sinkhole claims.  Feel free to email me your thoughts.  I hope you have a good weekend.

Takeaway:

This is such an important issue; however, I don’t think most insurers have implemented processes and procedures to take advantage of their rights under this holding.

The Sebo case calls for a whole new set of checklists and guides for handling cases in the Second DCA, and maybe even in Florida.  If you want to know more, please message me.


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Assignment of Benefit Homeowner Insurance Claims and Bill of Rights Working Group (Video)

Florida AOB & Industry Litigation Trend Report Image

First Party Property Insurance Blog is Proud to Announce our New E-Book: the Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook.

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook

We’re so confident in this E-Book that we offer you a money-back guarantee if it does not have the information you and your insurance claims business needed to improve. Click the link below to buy copies for you, your colleagues, and your partners.


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At the Bill of Rights Working Group recent meeting, Mr. Dry Out‘s Matthew Jerabek explained his concerns with the AOB contractors in the water damage claim industry.  Below is the video of his statements to the Working Group.  To be safe, I cannot promise that his statements are true because I have zero personal knowledge regarding the allegations; however, I think anyone who handles these claims would want to have the opportunity to hear his statements.

The Video

Embedly Powered

Although this may lead some carriers to take approaches based on emotion, assignment of benefits cases are the perfect type of case for statistical data evaluations to drive decision making.  They are also the perfect type of case to use document automation and litigation project management to achieve better outcomes at a fraction of the costs.

Don’t hire attorneys to have junior associates get you nowhere on these files for thousands of dollars.  If you want checklists, guides, or legal document templates for handling claims like this one, please message me.


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AOB Claims and the Bill of Rights Working Group

Florida AOB & Industry Litigation Trend Report Image

Overview:

After a water leak, homeowners often hire a contractor to make emergency repairs.  Contractors and homeowners and insurers often disagree about the cost to repair.  Read this article to learn how insurers, contractors, and the legislature are trying to resolve this dispute.


First Party Property Insurance Blog is Proud to Announce our New E-Book: the Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook.

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook

We’re so confident in this E-Book that we offer you a money-back guarantee if it does not have the information you and your insurance claims business needed to improve. Click the link below to buy copies for you, your colleagues, and your partners.


Add to CartView Cart


Johnson Strategies authored a fantastic post today about the impact of assignment of benefit claims on insurers and how the Homeowners’ Policy and Claims Bill of Rights Working Group is trying to address this problem.

How much are insurers losing as a result of the AOB claims?  Here is a quote from the post:

Addressing fraud this systemic starts with understanding that water damage claims are number one across all insurers–approaching 50% of  the total annual claim payout, with an average claim often in excess of $10,000. Using Citizens as a gauge, the 2012 total forecasted payout just for bursting pipes (not weather related roof leaks, or back up of sewers, etc) was in excess of $142,000,000. 

Using a hypothetical carrier with 180,000 policies I showed how just the deductible and plumbers’ referral fee resulted in fraudulent claim inflation of $3,375,000 every year.  

For all Florida property carriers including Citizens that’s roughly $150 million annually.

Then…when you add in the cost of unnecessary repairs, unnecessary drying services or water detection and the rank-and-file up-charging that everyone knows (and ICA workshop testimony confirms) is rampant, well…you get the ugly picture.

See the full post here (parentheticals omitted)(emphasis added).

Johnson Strategies suggests the legislature address the following concerns:

  • the substantial financial incentive for plumbers to refer AOB contractors;
  • AOB contractors perform all of the water damage mitigation services;
  • loose licensing requirements;
  • no required permits;
  • no required inspections; and
  • no requirement for pre-work estimates.

The Working Group made suggestions to address all of these concerns. Now, we must wait to see whether identifying these issues will be followed with a genuine solution from the legislature.

 Takeaway:

Although this may lead some carriers to take approaches based on emotion, assignment of benefits cases are the perfect type of case for statistical data evaluations to drive decision making.  They are also the perfect type of case to use document automation and litigation project management to achieve better outcomes at a fraction of the costs.

Don’t hire attorneys to have junior associates get you nowhere on these files for millions of dollars.  If you want checklists, guides, or legal document templates for handling claims like this one, please message me.


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