Tag Archives: Florida homeowners insurance law

Citizens Approves Another Round of Florida Homeowners Insurance Takeouts

Citizens Home Insurance Florida

Overview:

The Citizens takeouts continue. Insurers were recently authorized to assume nearly 100,000 policies from Citizens. Read more to find out the companies involved in this round of takeouts, and how successful the recent takeouts have been.

Update on Citizens Takeouts

Florida regulators approved Florida insurers to assume approximately 93,500 policies from Citizens. The companies and their allotment include:

  • Mount Beacon: 35,000
  • Anchor Property & Casualty: 28,000
  • Heritage: 20,500
  • Southern Oak: 10,000

The Tampa Tribune gave us some interesting statistics on how many of these recent takeout approvals actually converted to takeouts. In 2014, although approximately 1.1M policies were approved for assumption, insurers only assumed approximately 415,000.

In the last two years, Citizens has seen its policy count decrease from approximately 1.5M to 661,000. As a result, Citizens’s exposure has decreased from $510B to $200B.

If you want to know more about the takeouts over the past several months, here are our articles:

If you want to learn more about some of the other insurers involved in the recent takeouts (Mount Beacon, Anchor, Homeowners Choice, and more), make sure to click on the links in the bullets above, or you can view all of our Takeout articles on one page here.

If you have any questions about this article or anything else, please contact me.

The Top Ten First Party Property Insurance Blog Posts

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook
Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook

 

First Party Property Insurance Blog’s Top Ten Posts and Pages

1. Our Getting Started Home Page: we built this page a few months ago to help people navigate the Blog, and it was viewed over 8,000 times. If you haven’t seen it, it is by far and away the best way to navigate through the Blog and find what information you need.

2. Our List of the Biggest and Fastest Growing Florida Homeowners Insurers: viewed over 1,000 times during its limited time on the Blog. Surprisingly, most of the people we speak with did not pay attention to this; however, if you’re in this business, it’s the most important thing to know.

3. Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims for Water Leaks and Damage, and the Constant or Repeated Seepage Exclusion: viewed nearly 1,000 times this year. This massive post includes everything you need to know about the most popular coverage issue in Florida homeowners insurance claims.

4. A $7M Alleged Insurance Fraud – Espinosa Arrest Affidavit: approximately 1,000 times since being posted this year. Unfortunately, we haven’t been able to publish any of the updates. Nevertheless, this post is by far and away the most entertaining post on the Blog.

5. Florida Homeowners Insurance Statutes: we had over 800 visitors view this page. It’s a page you must bookmark right now in your web browser. It’s the only easy way to find the Florida homeowners insurance statutes, and we included tons of additional content to help you, too.

6. Problems and Solutions for Assignment of Benefits Claims: nearly 1,000 people visited our site for analysis on the assignment of benefits issues, and this was the most popular AOB post this year. If we had the time, we would write a post on this issue every single day. This is such a hot topic right now. We encourage you to contribute on this issue by sending us information. If you want to guest post, we will gladly share it with hundreds of subscribers and thousands of readers, and we won’t hesitate to give you credit.

7. Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims for Hail Damage to the Roof – Article & Analysis: hundreds of people viewed this post from a few months ago. This is probably the second most controversial issue in the industry (behind the AOB claims issues). We would also welcome you to guest post on this issue; help our readers out; and give you and your company exposure.

8. Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims for Water Leak Not Excluded as a Matter of Law: hundreds of readers reviewed our detailed analysis on what could be the most important Florida homeowners insurance appellate decision of the year. If you haven’t read the case or my article and you’re handling homeowners insurance claims in Florida, then you’re committing malpractice. It’s an extremely important decision moving forward.

9. All of the Posts on the Citizens Sinkhole Settlements: here is a post on the most recent Citizens sinkhole settlement, and it has links to all of the other Citizens sinkhole settlements.

10. All the Posts on the Citizens Takeouts: here is a link to the latest post on this year’s Citizens takeouts. While reading that post, you can find links to all of the prior settlements.

If you have any questions about this article or anything else Florida homeowners insurance claims related, please contact us.


The Calm Before the Insurance Storm: What if Hurricane Wilma Made Landfall in Florida in 2015

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook

If you are looking for Hurricane Irma Florida insurance claims resources, click here.

Introduction

My Claims Journal series “Digitizing Claims Litigation: Providing Insurers with the Power and Control They Deserve” focused on the intersection of technology and property insurance claims.  In this article, I wanted to discuss more than technology and explore what could happen if a storm like Hurricane Wilma makes landfall in 2015.

Ask yourself: has anything changed in the past decade? We take a look at how indemnity exposure has changed; however, we really focus in on whether loss adjustment expenses would be any different, and we focus on whether the laws and technology have changed anything.

Hurricane Wilma only pummeled Florida for approximately five hours, but its legacy lasted another decade.  Nobody could have predicted that this storm would give rise to over a million insurance claims, and over nine billion dollars in damages.  Thousands Wilma claims were filed each year, and many were not resolved until just a couple of years ago.

Fast forward to 2015. Would anything be different if Hurricane Wilma made landfall in Florida today? It depends on what you focus on. A lot has changed, and a lot has stayed the same. Let’s explore the advances in two key areas: indemnity and loss adjustment expenses.

Indemnity

From an indemnity exposure standpoint, most of the developments since Hurricane Wilma have been positive.  Many of the traditionally hurricane-prone states have compiled financial protection against losses, including impressive catastrophe funds, effective reinsurance, and increased risk transfer to the private sector. Additionally, there has been a strong initiative to educate the nation about flood insurance.

All that being said, the stakes are still very high. Real estate growth is all over the coast, and so are our greatest potential losses. Studies suggest that a hurricane like Hurricane Wilma will still have the same or greater indemnity impact on insurers in 2015.

Accordingly, although we did not learn our lesson and continued to build in the most disaster-prone areas, we were lucky enough to have a long enough gap in hurricanes to save a good amount of money.

Loss Adjustment Expenses

In addition to the lost profit of indemnity, loss adjustment expenses also skyrocket following a hurricane. If a hurricane makes landfall in 2015, will loss adjustment be any less expensive than it was in 2005?

Legal Developments’ Impact on Loss Adjustment Expenses

Lawyers and lawmakers spent the last decade trying to respond to the 2004 and 2005 hurricane seasons. Although there were some positive legal developments, the legal framework is mostly the same.

Florida’s 90-day rule statutory amendment imposed a significant burden on insurers: try to pay all hurricane claims within 90 days after receiving notice of the claim. Further, there have been no changes to the attorney fee statute benefiting successful attorneys representing homeowners. That being said, the ensuing property insurance bills in Florida helped mitigate some of the expense risks. Some of the positive laws in Florida since 2005 include reduced time limitations for hurricane claims, and opportunities to offer modified percentage deductibles.

Meanwhile, in courtrooms across Florida, lawyers spent nearly a decade trying to iron out the parameters of coverage for hurricane claims. When the dust settled, not much had changed.  The vast majority of cases can result in expensive and risky jury trials.

Conclusion

If a large scale hurricane like Wilma makes landfall in 2015, insurance companies should be proud that they likely have the financial resources to help their insureds recover. Unfortunately, despite the ensuing technology revolution and all of the legal expenses incurred in the past decade, adjusting and closing these claims will still cost insurers the same amount it cost them nearly ten years ago. Although the lawmakers and lawyers could not make any monumental breakthroughs, the industry can hold out hope that technology is inches away from revolutionizing how we view hurricane risk.


Have Any More Questions about Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims?

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Florida Citizens Takeout Update: Homeowners Choice Insurance Authorized to Assume 50,000 Citizens Policies

Citizens Property Insurance Corporation

Homeowners Choice has been authorized to assume approximately 50,000 Citizens policies. 27,000 of these policies are wind-only coverage.

For those of you keeping track, here are the details on the takeouts occurring over the last few months:

If you want to learn more about some of the other insurers involved in the recent takeouts, make sure to click on the links in the bullets above, or you can view all of these articles on one page here.


Have Any Questions about Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims?

If you have any questions about this article or Florida homeowners insurance claims and litigation, please contact us.

Florida Sinkhole Homeowners Insurance Update Regarding the Second DCA on Sinkhole Burden of Proof

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook

Brief Summary

In Mejia v. Citizens, Florida’s Second DCA held that Citizens had the burden of proof to show that sinkhole activity was not the cause of the plaintiff’s property damage. Once Mejia proved the property suffered a loss during the policy period, Citizens was required to show that the loss was excluded under this policy. In addition, the Court ruled that the amount of money Citizens paid to its engineer during the previous three years ($9.5M) was admissible.

For a copy of the Mejia opinion, scroll to the bottom of this article.

This is one of several key sinkhole homeowners insurance opinions in the last couple of months. If you missed the last few, you can read them here:

Omega v. Johnson

Contract for Repairs Argument Upheld

2011 Statutory Structural Damage Definition Applies to Policies Issued After Senate Bill 408’s Effective Date

Homeowner Not Required to Produce Sinkhole Report Before Lawsuit


How does CaseGlide Solve This Problem?

To learn more about how our proprietary claims litigation software CaseGlide solves this problem, check out our First Party Property Insurance Blog article on CaseGlide here.


The Mejia Opinion

Download (PDF, 59KB)


Have Any More Questions about Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims?

If you have any questions about this article or anything else, please contact us.

Florida Approves Takeout of More Than 180,000 Insurance Policies from Citizens

Citizens Property Insurance Corporation

Citizens Takeouts

Florida recently approved more than 180,000 takeouts of personal and commercial property insurance policies from Citizens. This follows September’s takeout opportunity of approximately 425,000 policies discussed in this article, and an earlier October takeout of over 200,000 policies discussed here.

In the most recent takeout, Florida regulators approved the following takeouts:

Anchor Property & Casualty Insurance Company Insurance Company – 50,000 personal residential policies

• Avatar Property & Casualty Insurance Company – 10,000 personal residential policies

Cypress Property & Casualty Insurance Company – 23,000 personal residential policies

Heritage Property & Casualty Insurance Company – 20,000 personal residential policies and up to 500 commercial residential polices

Mount Beacon Insurance Company – 38,485 personal residential policies

Prepared Insurance Company – 20,000 personal residential policies

Security First Insurance Company – 8,555 personal residential policies

Southern Oak Insurance Company –  10,000 personal residential policies

United Property & Casualty Insurance Company – 2,027 commercial residential policies

Have any more questions about this article or other Florida homeowners insurance claims issues? Please contact us.

 

 

Florida Sinkhole Homeowners Insurance Update Regarding Homeowner Not Required to Produce Competing Sinkhole Report Obtained After Denial

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook

 Overview:

Florida’s Second DCA recently answered an important question in Florida sinkhole homeowners insurance litigation: if (1) a homeowner has a competing engineering report it obtains after an insurer denies a sinkhole claim and (2) the insurer does not request the report, the homeowner is not required to produce the report before filing a lawsuit.

In a concise opinion embedded at the end of this post, Florida’s Second DCA in Herrera v. Tower Hill determined that the insureds were not required to produce their competing engineering report prior to filing their lawsuit against Tower Hill.  In summary, Tower Hill argued that the insureds’ failure to produce the report constituted a breach of the “concealment or fraud” and the “duties after loss” provisions.

Tower Hill argued that the insureds, before filing the lawsuit, should be required to to produce the report to Tower Hill. If the insureds would have produced the report, Tower Hill could have evaluated the report and the parties could have avoided the litigation altogether. The trial court granted Tower Hill’s motion for summary judgment on these arguments.

The Second DCA reversed the trial court’s finding in favor of Tower Hill. The Second DCA explained that “[t]hese conditions apply where the insurer admits liability but disputes the recovery amount. See Tower Hill Select Ins. Co. v. McKee, 39 Fla. L. Weekly D1756, at *1. The policy did not require the Herreras to give the Geohazards report to Tower Hill unless they had the report at the time of the claim, but before Tower Hill denied it. See Surrett v. First Liberty Ins. Co., No. 8:11-cv-60-T-23MAP, 2011 WL 3879515, at *2 (M.D. Fla. Sept. 2, 2011).”

Takeaway:

This is a very popular argument for insurers; however, the Second DCA did not agree that it applied to this specific set of facts. Interestingly, the Second DCA may have “left the door open” to this argument: if Tower Hill would have requested the report at some point after it was created, the policy may have required the insureds to produce the report before the lawsuit. That’s not exactly what the opinion states; however, you have to assume the Second DCA mentioned that fact for a reason.

In addition, Tower Hill’s arguement may still provide it with a defense to the insureds’ attorney’s fees as discussed here in our analysis of Omega v. Johnson.

This is one of several key sinkhole homeowners insurance opinions in the last couple of months. If you missed the last three, you can read them here:

Omega v. Johnson

Contract for Repairs Argument Upheld

2011 Statutory Structural Damage Definition Applies to Policies Issued After Senate Bill 408’s Effective Date


As a reminder, we have the complete Herrera v. Tower Hill order embedded at the end of this post.

Let me know your thoughts on this opinion and feel free to send me a message.


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The Complete Order in Herrera v. Tower Hill

Download (PDF, 57KB)

Florida Approves Takeout of More Than 210,00 Insurance Policies from Citizens

Citizens Property Insurance Corporation

Late last week, Florida approved more than 210,000 takeouts of personal and commercial property insurance policies from Citizens.  This follows September’s takeout opportunity of approximately 425,000 policies discussed in this article.

In this October takeout, Florida regulators approved the following takeouts:

American Colonial Insurance Company – 22,050 personal residential policies

Cypress Property & Casualty Insurance Company – 23,000 personal residential policies

Heritage Property & Casualty Insurance Company – 20,000 personal residential policies and up to 600 commercial residential polices

Homeowners Choice Property & Casualty Insurance Company – 69,000 personal residential policies

Mount Beacon Insurance Company – 29,515 personal residential policies

Olympus Insurance Company – 10,000 personal residential policies

Safepoint Insurance Company – 18,000 personal residential policies

United Property & Casualty Insurance Company – 2,027 commercial residential policies

Weston Insurance Company – 19,515 personal residential policies and up to 1,781 commercial residential and non-residential policies




Have Any More Questions about Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims?

P

Please contact us.


photo from: https://www.citizensfla.com/about/newsroom.cfm

Florida’s Fifth DCA Rules that Homeowners Insurer Does Not Have to Pay Attorneys’ Fees When it Flips Sinkhole Coverage Decision After Lawsuit

Florida Homeowners Insurance Claims and Litigation Handbook

 Overview:

According to Florida’s Fifth DCA, a homeowners insurer can reverse its position in a sinkhole case and still not be required to pay attorneys’ fees.  Read more about Omega Insurance Company v. Johnson to find out how Omega perfectly handled a disputed sinkhole claim.


 

In Johnson v. Omega Insurance Company, Florida’s Fifth DCA held that it is possible for a homeowners insurer to make a mistake in a sinkhole case and still not have to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in attorneys’ fees.  I include a full copy of the opinion at the end of this post.

Facts

Omega, a Tower Hill company, followed the statutes from the beginning to end. Relying on a report from a professional engineering and geology firm, Omega initially denied the sinkhole claim. The homeowner hired an attorney, and that attorney hired an engineer to contradict Omega’s decision. According to the homeowner’s engineer, Omega’s engineer may have been wrong – there may have been sinkhole activity causing damage.

Instead of providing this report to Omega and allowing Omega to make a decision based on the new information, the homeowner’s attorney sued Omega, and then provided the report to Omega in discovery. As discussed below, Omega was entitled to rely on its engineering and geology firm’s report.

In response to the homeowner’s lawsuit, Omega submitted the case to neutral evaluation (which we know is mandatory), and the neutral evaluator sided with the homeowner – sinkhole activity may be the cause of the damage. In response to the neutral evaluator’s opinion, Omega agreed to comply with the neutral evaluator, accepted coverage, and tendered the policy benefits to the homeowner.

Now that there was no dispute, the homeowner made her next move: a motion for confession of judgment and attorneys’ fees.

Holding

The Fifth DCA determined Omega did everything right. By complying with every Florida statute for sinkhole claims, Omega did not do anything that wrongfully led the homeowner to resort to litigation. Accordingly, Omega did not have to pay the homeowner’s attorneys’ fees.

Takeaway

As you know, the homeowners insurers that are still litigating sinkhole cases rely very heavily on these arguments. In short, the argument is that the insurer is entitled to rely on its expert absent any competing reports.  When you combine that presumption with the confession of judgment doctrine, insurers believe that they should never have to pay attorneys’ fees when a homeowner’s attorney hides a report that could have led to no lawsuit in the first place.

You can bet these insurers are relieved that their hard work paid off in this case. With hundreds of thousands of dollars per case looming over every adjuster’s head on every case, a decision the other way would have been tough for these insurers to endure.

Of course, this outcome could have been different for a number of reasons- what if the homeowner did not have the report before filing the lawsuit?  Most homeowners’ attorneys would not make this same mistake today.

The Second DCA in Colella v. State Farm has a similar holding for insurers to rely on.  In Johnson, the Fifth DCA called Colella and Johnson “strikingly similar.”

For those remaining sinkhole cases (many have settled), homeowners insurers’ attorneys will have another tool in their arsenal.

The Big Takeaways

With sinkhole claims dwindling, the big takeaway here is that this logic can be applied to other types of insurance claims.  Johnson stands for the longstanding Florida proposition that homeowners need to give insurers a chance to fully evaluate the claim instead of “hiding the ball.” The sinkhole statutes may provide an added level of protection – the presumption of correctness – but the arguments in this case are undoubtedly applicable to any other case where the homeowner withholds information in her possession before she files the lawsuit.

Additionally, if you have been following along, you may have noticed that this is the third big sinkhole case in favor of homeowners insurers in the last two weeks. If you missed the first two, you better read them here:

Contract for Repairs Argument Upheld

2011 Statutory Structural Damage Definition Applies to Policies Issued After Senate Bill 408’s Effective Date


Did this Article Answer Your Homeowners Insurance Question?

If not, please contact us.


And here is the complete copy of the order:

Download (PDF, 78KB)

Florida Regulators Approve Takeout of 425,000 Citizens Policies

Citizens Property Insurance Corporation


Citizens Property Insurance Corporation Logo

Yesterday, Florida insurance regulators announced that several Florida homeowners insurance companies will have the option to takeout a total of 425,000 policies. According to the Tampa Bay Times, the two biggest approvals went to Heritage Property & Casualty Ins. Co. (approximately 70,000) and Elements Property Insurance Co. (approximately 60,000.00).

These 425,000 policies comprise nearly half of the estimated 933,000 outstanding Citizens policies.

In addition to Heritage and Elements, regulators also authorized the following companies to assume policies from Citizens:

  • American Integrity Insurance Co.
  • Avatar Property & Casualty Insurance Co.
  • Capitol Preferred Insurance Co.
  • Mount Beacon Insurance Co.;
  • Olympus Insurance Co.
  • Safepoint Insurance Co.
  • Southern Fidelity Insurance Co.
  • Southern Fidelity Property & Casualty Insurance Co.
  • Southern Oak Insurance Co.
  • Tower Hill Signature Insurance Co.
  • United Property & Casualty Insurance Co.
  • Universal Insurance Co. of North America

This will shake up First Party Property Insurance Blog’s Florida Homeowners Insurers Lists. Take a look at that page if you want to know where the policy counts stood earlier this year.

If you have any questions about this article or anything else, please contact us.

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